On Tuesday, Towson University and Presidential Scholar, Dr. Nancy Grasmick, welcomed bestselling author Daniel Pink to speak to a group of 350+ educators, school administrators, business leaders, and students on the topic of motivation in education and business

Mr. Pink was engaging and funny, but most of all he was insightful. Here are three takeaways from his speech:

  • Allowing employees time to work on non-commissioned or “non-contract” projects (without constraint) will likely motivate them to be more creative. Take this, for example, “the commissioned works [of artists] were rated as significantly less creative than the noncommissioned works, yet they were not rated as different in technical quality.” (Amabile, Phillips & Collins, 1993)
  • Progress is the single biggest motivator on the job. Give your employees regular feedback and celebrate progress – don’t wait until their annual review.
  • Schedule a genius hour. Genius hour is a movement that allows students to explore their own passions and encourages creativity in the classroom. It provides students a choice in what they learn during a set period of time during school.

This event was a part of the Towson University Signature Forum speaker series. The Forums focus on providing Maryland’s education leaders, parents, teachers, and policy makers with access to the newest information and research on current and pertinent education topics. The next event will be held on March 6, 2014 with keynote speaker Sharon Lynn Kagan.

Dr, Nancy Grasmick, Towson University Presidential Scholar; Daniel Pink, Author and Speaker; Dr. Leslie Wilson, Assistant to the Presidential Scholar

Dr, Nancy Grasmick, Towson University Presidential Scholar; Daniel Pink, Author and Speaker; Dr. Leslie Wilson, Assistant to the Presidential Scholar

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References
Amabile, T.M., Phillips, E., Collins, M.A.; “Person and Environment in Talent Development: The Case of Creativity,” (1993)